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 Post subject: Landing Craft Assault
PostPosted: 13 Jun 2009, 12:35 
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Location: Haarlem, the Netherlands
The Landing Craft Assault (LCA) was the British and Commonwealth landing craft of the Second World War. It was the main small landing craft used to put troops ashore.

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History
After the problems experienced at Gallipoli during the First World War, it was obvious that for a successful landing, troops had to be put ashore safely and quickly in large numbers. The design and production, and use of landing craft was the responsibility of the Royal Navy
The first LCAs were put into service at the start of the Second World War and were used for landing British forces thereafter, though among their first duties was evacuation from Dunkerque (Operation Dynamo).
The LCA was used for every landing in Europe, for Madagascar and with the Commonwealth fleets (RN, RAN and RNZN) in the Far East. Following the invasions of Normandy and southern France, production of LCAs was stopped in Europe. Some manufacture continued in the Far East up until the end of the war there.
Sixteen LCA could be carried on the British 7000-ton Landing Ship, Infantry from davits.
In RN service LCA were normally crewed by Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) officers and ratings who had signed up for hostilities only and later by Royal Marines
The LCA was never operated by the US, though on many occasions in Europe RN LCAs were used to transport US troops. Some were used to this end on D-Day, for the US Army Rangers on Omaha and Pointe du Hoc and some for other army battalions at Utah Beach and Omaha Beach. Two battalions of US Army Rangers and two battalions from 1st amd 29th Infantry Divisions were landed on Omaha Beach by a number of RNVR LCA Flotillas in the first waves at the Eastern and Western extremities of Omaha beach on D-Day.

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Royal Navy LCA landing craft churn through the waters of a British port, taking American troops to a waiting ship during preparations for the Normandy invasion, circa May-Jun 1944

Design
The LCA was built of wood with steel armour bolted on to protect the occupants. The LCA had a long central section with seating for the troops, this was divided from the landing ramp in the bow by bulkhead fitted with two vertically hinged doors. Immediately behind the bulkhead were a steering position and a light machine gun (eg Bren gun) position, the wheel to the starboard and the LMG to the port.
Drive was by two shafts from the pair of low-powered Ford engines which limited the boat's speed. Fuel capacity was 64 imperial gallons (290 l). Steering was by two rudders. The landing ramp was relatively narrow at only 4 ft 6 inches wide, limiting the speed at which the troops could disembark.
LCAs were designed for silent assault by Commandos, resting low in the water and capable of approaching a beach quietly. Early production of LCAs included buoyancy material in the hull, which made the boats almost unsinkable, but as production increased buoyancy materials became short leading to a number of LCAs being constructed with empty hulls.
Total production was about two thousand.

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 Post subject: Re: Landing Craft Assault
PostPosted: 13 Jun 2009, 12:51 
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Some more pictures

The rare photographs below show newly completed Landing Craft Assault (LCAs) being handed over to the Royal Navy by builders Elliotts of Reading, Berkshire, England. It is believed the photographs were taken in September 1944.

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The 6 landing craft assembled prior to handover ceremony.

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Repositioned for ease of access in readiness for the handover ceremony.

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Another view of 2 above.

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Mike Taylor's father, Cyril Taylor worked for Elliotts from 1925 (age 16) to his retirement in 1974. He was involved in testing the craft on the river prior to handover and he can be seen standing between and behind a naval officer and Mr. Elliott, one of the directors of the firm. The person in the white coat was Reg Hemmings who later became a director. It is believed the other civilians in the photos were also in the employ of Elliotts having played their part in the construction of the craft.

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After the ceremony the craft were taken down the river by a mixture of naval personnel and Elliott's staff. Family folklore suggests that Cyril Taylor was amongst those delivering the craft to London.

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The craft just below Reading Bridge heading off towards London.

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 Post subject: Re: Landing Craft Assault
PostPosted: 13 Jun 2009, 13:43 
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Joined: 09 Jun 2009, 20:28
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Location: Ayrshire Scotland
nice photos never seen them before but i do know that some of them were made in portseatting East lothian
and the boat yard is still making boats today

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 Post subject: Re: Landing Craft Assault
PostPosted: 14 Jun 2009, 01:21 
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 Post subject: Re: Landing Craft Assault
PostPosted: 05 Jul 2009, 22:55 
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Location: France Pas de Calais
Spécifications techniques du LCA

Longueur : 12,55 m
Largeur : 3,10 m
Tirant d'eau :>0,55 m - 0,75 m<
Déplacement à vide : 9 T
Déplacement en charge : 13 T
Vitesse : 7 <> 9 noeuds
Rayon d'action : 90 <> 140 miles
Capacité : 35 hommes , 400 Kg d'équipement
Armement : 1 FM BREN , 2 mitrailleuse , 2 mortier de 50 mm
Blindage léger contre les armes légères
Capacité du réservoir , 290 L d'essence
Motorisation : 2 moteurs Ford V8 de 65 CV
Equipage : 4 hommes , 1 officier pour 3 LCA

Technical specification of the LCA

Length : 12,55 m
Width : 3,10 m
Draft : >0,55 m - 0,75 m<
Weight vacuous : 9 T
Weight in load : 11 T
Speed : 7 <> 9 Knots
Autonomy : 90 <> 140 miles
Capacity : 35 men , 400 Kg of equipment
Armament : 1FM BREN , 2 Machin Gun , 2 50mm Mortar
Light armor against small weapons
Capacity of the gas tank, 290 L of gasoline
Motors : 2 Ford V8 of 65 HP
Crew : 4 men , 1 officer for 3 LCA


Matériel embarqué

1 ancre avec chaine
9 l d'huile
7 Kg de graisse
2 aussières
2 par battage
1 bouée de sauvetage
1 sceau
1 écoppe
1 compas

Embarked equipment

1 anchor with chaine
9 l of oil
7 kg of grease
2 aussières (rope)
2 by beating
1 life preserver
1 bucket
1 écoppe
1 compass


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